LGBT Discrimination Already Wide Spread
in the U.S.

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(via Pink News)

One in four LGBT people in the US have experienced discrimination because of their sexual orientation, new research has revealed.

The survey, conducted by the Centre for American Progress, included episodes of discrimination which took place during the previous year, both at work and in public.

In the workplace, between 11 percent and 28 percent of LGBT people reported losing a promotion based on their sexuality.

27 percent of transgender reported being fired or not hired in the past year.

It comes despite the US government still not having statutory non-discrimination law to protect people from discrimination based on sexual orientation.

This means that there is no legal ban on firing people for being gay.

The evidence is damning for employers, with half of those affected saying discrimination damaged their performance at work.

Findings show that people are more likely to hide or change their behaviour when at work or in public places in a bid to avoid discrimination.

The survey, together with interviews, revealed that LGBT people change the way they dress, hide personal relationships and alter their lives out of fear of discrimination.

It has led to a huge seven in 10 LGBT employees disguising the true nature of their personal relationships, such as opting to not specify the gender of who they are dating.

Meanwhile almost half felt safer avoiding social situations completely.

A huge 68.5 percent reported suffering from psychological trauma after experiencing discrimination.

Democrats have relaunched the Equality Act which if passed will ensure non-discrimination policies for the LGBT community.

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin said: “The Equality Act will once and for all end the unacceptable patchwork of non-discrimination laws across this country that leaves LGBTQ people at risk.

“Every American should have a fair chance to earn a living, provide for their families, and live their lives without fear of discrimination.”